Naked Maths: Equations Stripped

By on 18/07/2017

Putting the Naked in Naked Mathematician, Tom Crawford has launched a new series called ‘Equations Stripped’ where in each episode he takes an in-depth look at some of the most important equations in maths, stripping them back layer by layer so that everyone can understand…

First up are the Navier-Stokes equations which model the flow of every fluid on Earth. From the movement of ice sheets (including the giant iceberg that recently split from Antartica) to the motion of aeroplanes in the sky and the design of Formula 1 racing cars, layer one explains how the Navier-Stokes equations are an invaluable tool for engineers and mathematicians alike. Layer two discusses the derivation of the equations using Newton’s second law of motion, while in layer three the meaning behind each term in the equation is explained. Finally, in layer four the individual variables are identified with helpful examples.

The second episode takes a more artistic view of mathematical equations as Euler’s Identity is stripped back layer by layer to reveal its inner beauty. Tom describes a recent neurological experiment that shows how maths equations can evoke the same feelings as a piece of classical music or a great work of art and therefore should be treated in the same manner. Layer one of the equation looks at the individual numbers present: 0, 1, e, pi, and i – the five most important mathematical constants. In layer two we see how the equation is derived from the power series forms of the trigonometric and exponential functions and in layer three the geometry of the complex plane is explained.

The third episode looking at Newton’s Calculus will be online shortly so make sure you subscribe to be the first to hear about it.

If you would like to see more of Tom’s work please check out his website or you can find him on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @tomrocksmaths.

 

 

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